Telling Your Rotary Club’s Story on Social Media: Posting on Local Blogs

Using social media to tell the story of your Rotary club does not mean focusing only on your club’s own website, blog, or Facebook/Twitter accounts. It may be useful to post stories on websites and blogs that have a stronger readership base than your own.

The main local blog for my club’s community is “The Hill Is Home”. So I started writing posts for that blog, not directly about our club, but about the really great work of our nonprofit partners and how we are working with them. This may help not only our club, but also the local blog on which I post hopefully useful stories as well as the nonprofits we work with. It seems to be win-win for all parties and it may help in promoting volunteer work more generally.

In case this may be helpful as an illustration of the approach, the text of two recent posts are reproduced below. Note that in each post I provide basic information on our club and how to be contacted in the note at the bottom of each post. Each post has a picture from the respective nonprofits reproduced here. Please don’t hesitate to share your own views on how to use social media by posting a comment.

Example 1 – Post published after a speaker from a local nonprofit partner came to our club – “Reaching Out to the Homeless: Capitol Hill Group Ministry”

HART06

This week Abby Sypek was the guest speaker at our bi-weekly meeting of the Rotary Club of Capitol Hill. Abby is the Community Engagement Coordinator at Capitol Hill Group Ministry. She has worked in homeless services in DC for almost three years and is passionate about ending homelessness in the District. Before moving to DC, she worked in the non-profit sector for over ten years.

I was impressed by Abby’s personal commitment and outgoing personality, the work of Capitol Hill Group Ministry (CHGM), and the opportunities the organization provide for volunteers who would like to help. CHGM provides a comprehensive suite of services for homeless families and individuals, ranging from homelessness prevention to helping those on the street regain access to housing and connecting them to health services, among others.

One of their innovative programs is HART, which stands for Homeless Assistance Response Team. HART volunteers are trained in street outreach techniques and processes to be able to help the homeless access shelter, especially on hypothermic nights. When temperatures are very low, the body may lose heat and lead to hypothermia, which can ultimately lead to death. This makes it essential to have volunteers checking on those who need shelter. But the program also runs at other times of the year to provide snacks and seasonally appropriate supplies as needed. The fact that the program runs year-long is a great way to build relationships with those who are homeless and make sure that if they need support, such support can indeed be provided.

HART is operated by volunteers to complement outreach by case workers. The program is coordinated by Abby. It is not only beneficial for the homeless, but also for volunteers who often find the experience highly rewarding. As part of our Capitol Hill Pro Bono Initiative, our Rotary club is partnering with Capitol Hill Group Ministry in order to conduct a rapid assessment of the benefits of HART not only for the homeless and volunteers, but also for the city.

If you would like to volunteer with CHGM through the HART program, you can register for their volunteer training which typically takes place once a month on the third Tuesday of the month. This is likely to be a great experience that you will not regret. The next training is on August 16 and you can sign up to attend here. All are welcome!

 Quentin Wodon is President of the Rotary Club of Capitol Hill which meets every second and fourth Tuesdays of the month at 7:30 AM at the Dubliner on F Street. To contact him, or to learn more about the Capitol Hill Pro Bono Initiative, please send him an email through the Contact Me page of his blog at www.rotarianeconomist.com.

Example 2 – Post published before a speaker from a local nonprofit partner came to our club – “Enabling Disadvantaged Youths to Succeed: Latin America Youth Center”

LAYC

More than 17,000 young adults ages 18-24 in the Washington Metropolitan Area are considered as disconnected from work and school. Quite a few of them live in or near Capitol Hill. These youth are often from low-income families. They are not in school and out of work. They typically face multiple challenges, including homelessness, issues with the courts, or substance abuse. These challenges prevent them from successfully transitioning into adulthood. There is hope, however, in that programs reaching out to these youths have been proven to work.

The number of nonprofits in the District that have implemented rigorous impact evaluations of their programs for disadvantaged youths is small. Latin America Youth Center (LAYC) is one of them. The organization uses an innovative approach to address the needs of youth at especially high risk. Its Promotor Pathway is a long-term, intensive, holistic case management and mentorship intervention. Data from a five year randomized controlled trial impact evaluation suggest that the program has led to positive changes in terms of increasing school enrollment, reducing birth rates, and reducing homelessness among youth participating in the program. The evaluation report is available on the website of the Urban Institute.

The Promotor Pathway program is a flagship initiative for LAYC, but the organization also runs other programs, including in the areas of education, workforce readiness, housing, community building, mental health services, arts, and healthy recreation. LAYC was founded in 1968. Today, it serves 4,000 individuals per year. As a result there are plenty of ways for you to get involved if you would like to help. In order to volunteer, simply go to their website, and check for opportunities under the “Get Involved” section of the site. By volunteering, you can really make a difference in the life of the less fortunate with a top notch local nonprofit.

One last thing: Shayna Scholnick, the Director of the Promotor Pathway program for the District, will be guest speaker at our bi-weekly meeting of the Rotary Club of Capitol Hill on Tuesday August 23. As part of our Capitol Hill Pro Bono Initiative, my Rotary club is partnering with LAYC to help Shayna conduct a cost-benefit analysis of the Promotor Pathway program. If you would like to know more about the program or LAYC more generally, please feel free to join our Rotary club meeting that day. All are welcome to join.

Quentin Wodon is President of the Rotary Club of Capitol Hill which meets every second and fourth Tuesdays of the month at 7:30 AM at the Dubliner on F Street. To contact him, or to learn more about the Capitol Hill Pro Bono Initiative, please send him an email through the Contact Me page of his blog at www.rotarianeconomist.com.

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